Latin cooking no longer is associated with heavy, high fat Tex-Mex style foods. According to a recent study, Hispanic ingredients such as the Mexican herb epazote, Yucatecan sour, Seville oranges and mild Peruvian aji amarillo chiles are now being used to flavor authentic recipes in restaurants.


Latin cooking no longer is associated with heavy, high fat Tex-Mex style foods. According to a recent study, Hispanic ingredients such as the Mexican herb epazote, Yucatecan sour, Seville oranges and mild Peruvian aji amarillo chiles are now being used to flavor authentic recipes in restaurants. Feeding the trend is the growing Latino population in the U.S. and American consumers’ cravings for fresh and ethnic foods.
Source: Packaged Facts

A new study suggests that fruit and vegetable consumption is related to the presence or absence of grocery stores, food markets and convenience stores in neighborhoods. Residents with access to large grocery stores on average ate 0.69 servings of fruits and veggies per day. The study, published in the American Journal of Health Promotion, also said that fruit and vegetable stands and trucks could boost produce consumption in underserved neighborhoods, many of which are in impoverished areas.
Source: Health Behavior News Service

Sweet relief. Are tough economic times causing people to reach for that good old mood-enhancer: chocolate? The National Confectioners Association reports that U.S. retail sales of chocolate confections grew 2.3 percent to $15.9 billion last year and the Hershey Co. said that 2008 fourth-quarter profits increased 51.2 percent to $82.2 million.
Source: Conde Nast Portfolio.com