Do consumers really believe that products labeled “green” have environmental benefits?In a recent BBMG survey, 23 percent of American consumers reported that they have "no way of knowing" if a product is green or actually does what it claims.


How many celebrity chefs can you name? Chances are more than you could a few years ago. A recent study by Packaged Facts found that -- fueled by cable TV shows -- consumer awareness of chefs and foodservice-branded food grew at a compound annual rate of 8 percent between 2004 and 2008.
Source: Packaged Facts’ MarketTrend: The U.S. Market for Chef- and Foodservice-branded Food Sold at Retail

Do consumers really believe that products labeled “green” have environmental benefits?In a recent BBMG survey, 23 percent of American consumers reported that they have "no way of knowing" if a product is green or actually does what it claims. Still, many feel that it’s worth buying environmentally responsible products. 77 percent agreed that they "can make a positive difference by purchasing products from socially or environmentally responsible companies.”
Source: BBMG Conscious Consumer Report: Redefining Value in a New Economy

Almost all (95 percent) women said they are “very/somewhat concerned” about the cost of food today, according to a recent survey by Better Homes & Gardens magazine.  In order to better handle household costs, women are using a number of strategies including: freezing foods (54 percent) and cooking in batches (21 percent) and cutting back on certain foods including baked goods and desserts (52 percent), convenience foods (48 percent), wine/alcohol (37 percent) and gourmet oils (36 percent).
Source: Better Homes and Gardens “The Food Factor” survey